PETER GRIMES

 

Personajes

PETER  GRIMES Pescador Tenor
ELLEN  ORFORD Viuda, Maestra de Escuela Soprano
BALSTRODE Marino Mercante Retirado Barítono
TÍA Propietaria de "El Jabalí" Contralto
SOBRINAS Chicas de "El Jabalí" Sopranos
BOLES Pescador Metodista Tenor
SWALLOW Abogado Bajo
SRA. SEDLEY Viuda, Rentista Soprano
REVERENDO Párroco Tenor
NED  KEENE Farmacéutico Barítono
HOBSON Arriero Bajo
DR. CRABBE Médico Personaje Mudo
EL CHICO Aprendiz de Peter Personaje Mudo

 

La acción se desarrolla en Borough, Reino Unido, a principios del siglo XX.

 

PROLOGUE  


(Interior of the Moot Hall, arranged as for Coroner's 
Inquest. Coroner, Mr. Swallow, at table on dais, clerk 
at table below. A crowd of townspeople in the body of 
the hall is kept back by Hobson acting as Constable. 
Mr. Swallow is the leading lawyer of the Borough and 
at the same time its Mayor and its Coroner. A man of 
unexceptionable career and talents, he nevertheless 
disturbs the burgesses by his air of a man with an 
arrière pensée) 


HOBSON 

(shouts)

Peter Grimes!

(Peter Grimes steps forward from among the crowd.)


SWALLOW 

(reading)

Peter Grimes, we are here to investigate 
the cause of death of your apprentice William Spode, 
whose body you brought ashore from your boat, 
"The Boy Billy", on the 26th ultimo. 
Do you wish to give evidence?

(Peter nods.)
 

Will you step into the box. Peter Grimes. 
Take the oath.
After me. "I swear by Almighty God"  

PETER

"I swear by Almighty God"

SWALLOW

"That the evidence I shall give"

PETER

"That the evidence I shall give"

SWALLOW

"Shall be the truth"

PETER

"Shall be the truth"

SWALLOW

"The whole truth and nothing but the truth."

PETER

"The whole truth and nothing but the truth."

SWALLOW

Tell the court the story in your own words.

(Peter is silent.)
 

You sailed your boat round the coast 
with the intention of putting in at London. 
Why did you do this?

PETER

We'd caught a huge catch, 
too big to sell here.

SWALLOW

And the boy died on the way?

PETER

The wind turned against us, blew us off our course. 
We ran out of drinking water.

SWALLOW

How long were you at sea?

PETER

Three days.

SWALLOW

What happened next?

PETER

He died lying there among the fish.

SWALLOW

What did you do?

PETER

Threw them all overboard, set sail for home.

SWALLOW

You mean you threw the fish overboard?...
When you landed did you call for help?

PETER

I called Ned Keene.

SWALLOW

The apothecary here?

(indicates Ned)
 

Was there anybody else called?

PETER

Somebody brought the parson.

SWALLOW

You mean the Rector, Mr. Horace Adams?

(The Rector steps forward. 
Swallow waves him back.)
 

All right, Mr. Adams.

(He turns back to Peter.)
 

Was there a certain amount of excitement?

PETER

Bob Boles started shouting.

SWALLOW

There was a scene in the village street 
from which you were rescued by our landlady?

PETER

Yes. By Auntie.

SWALLOW

We don't call her that here...
You then took to abusing a respectable lady.

(Peter glares.)
 

Answer me... You shouted abuse at a certain person?

(Mrs. Sedley pushes forward. Mrs. Sedley is the widow 
of a retired factor of the East India Company and is 
known locally as 'Mrs. Nabob'. She is 65, self-assertive, 
inquisitive, unpopular.)


MRS. SEDLEY

Say who! Say who!!

SWALLOW

Mrs. Sedley here.

PETER 

(fiercely)

I don't like interferers.

(A slight hubbub among the spectators resolves itself 
into a chorus which is more like the confused muttering 
of a crowd than something fully articulate.)


CHORUS

When women gossip the result
Is someone doesn't sleep at night.

HOBSON 

(shouting)

Silence!

SWALLOW

Now tell me this. 
Who helped you carry the boy home?
The schoolmistress, the widow, Mrs. Ellen Orford?

(Renewed hubbub. Ellen steps forward to Swallow.)


WOMEN'S

O when you pray you shut your eyes
And then can't tell the truth from lies.

HOBSON 

(shouts)

Silence!

SWALLOW

Mrs. Orford, as the schoolmistress, the widow, 
how did you come into this?

ELLEN

I did what I could to help.

SWALLOW

Why should you help this kind of fellow - callous, 
brutal, and coarse?

(to Grimes)
 

There's something here perhaps in your favour. 
I' m told you rescued the boy from drowning
in the March storms.

(Peter is silent.)
 

Have you something else to say?
No? - Then I have.
Peter Grimes, I here advise you - 
do not get another boy apprentice. 
Get a fisherman to
help you - big enough to stand up for himself. 
Our verdict is - that William Spode, your apprentice, 
died in accidental circumstances. But that's the kind 
of thing people are apt to remember.

CHORUS

But when the crowner sits upon it,
Who can dare to fix the guilt?

HOBSON 

(shouts)

Silence! Silence!

(Peter has stepped forward and is trying to speak.)


PETER

Your honour! Like every other fisherman 
I have to hire an apprentice. I must have help -

SWALLOW

Then get a woman help you look after him.

PETER

That's what I want - but not yet -

SWALLOW

Why not?

PETER

Not till I've stopped people's mouths.

(The hubbub begins again.)


SWALLOW 

(makes a gesture of dismissal)

Stand down! Clear the court. Stand down!

PETER

"Stand down" you say. You wash your hands.
The case goes on in people's minds
The charges that no court has made
Will be shouted at my head.
Then let me speak, let me stand trial,
Bring the accusers into the hall.
Let me thrust into their mouths,
The truth itself, the simple truth.

(He shouts this excitedly against the hubbub chorus.)


CHORUS

When women gossip, the result
Is someone doesn't sleep at night.
But when the crowner sits upon it,
Who can dare to fix the guilt?

(Against them all Constable Hobson shouts his:)


HOBSON

Clear the court!

(Swallow rises with slow dignity. Everybody stands up 
while he makes his ceremonial exit. The crowd then 
begins to go out. Peter and Ellen are left alone.)


PETER

The truth - the pity - and the truth.

ELLEN

Peter, come away!

PETER

Where the walls themselves
Gossip of inquest.

ELLEN

But we'll gossip, too,
And talk and rest.

PETER

While Peeping Toms
Nod as you go.
You'll share the name
Of outlaw, too.

ELLEN

Peter, we shall restore your name.
Warmed by the new esteem
That you will find.

PETER

Until the Borough hate
Poisons your mind.

ELLEN

There'll be new shoals to catch:
Life will be kind.

PETER

Ay! only of drowning ghosts:
Time will not forget:
The dead are witness
And fate is blind.

ELLEN

Unclouded,
The hot sun
Will spread his rays around.

BOTH

My/Your voice out of the pain,
Is like a hand
That you/I can feel and know:
Here is a friend.

(They walk off slowly as the curtain falls.)
 

Interlude 1


Dawn



ACT I


Scene 1


(Street by the sea: Moot Hall exterior with its outside 
staircase, next door to which is "The Boar". Ned 
Keene's apothecary's shop is at the street corner. 
On the other side breakwaters run down to the sea. It
is morning, before high tide, several days later. Two 
fishermen are turning the capstan, hauling in their 
boat. Prolonged cries as the boat is hauled ashore. 
Women come from mending nets to take the fish baskets 
from other fishermen who now disembark. Captain 
Balstrode sits on the breakwater looking out to sea 
through his glass. Balstrode is a retired merchant sea
captain, shrewd as a travelled man should be, but with 
a general sympathy that makes him the favourite rentier 
of the whole Borough. He chews a plug of tobacco 
while he watches)
 

CHORUS OF FISHERMEN AND WOMEN

Oh hang at open doors the net, the cork,
While squalid sea-dames at their mending work
Welcome the hour when fishing through the tide
The weary husband throws his freight aside.

FISHERMEN

O cold and wet and driven by the tide,
Beat your tired arms against your tarry side.
Find rest in public bars where fiery gin
Will aid the warmth that languishes within.

(Several fishermen cross to "The Boar" where 
Auntie stands in the doorway.)


FISHERMAN

Auntie!

AUNTIE

Come in gentlemen, come in.

BOLES

Her vats flow with poisoned gin!

(Boles the Methodist fisherman stands aside 
from all this dram drinking.)


FISHERMAN

Boles has gone Methody!

(Points and laughs.)


AUNTIE

A man should have
Hobbies to cheer his private life.

(Fishermen go into "The Boar". Others remain 
with their wives at the nets and boats.)


WOMEN

Dabbling on shore half-naked sea-boys crowd,
Swim round a ship, or swing upon a shroud
Or in a boat purloined with paddles play
And grow familiar with the watery way.

(While the second boat is being hauled in, 
boys are scrambling over the first.)


BALSTRODE

Shoo, you little barnacles!
Up your anchors, hoist your sails!

(Balstrode chases them from the boat. A more 
respectable figure now begins, with much hat-raising, 
his morning progress down the High Street. He makes 
straight for "The Boar".)


FISHERMAN 

(touches cap)

Dr. Crabbe.

BOLES 

(points as the swing door closes)

He drinks "Good Health" to all diseases!

Another FISHERMAN

Storm?

A FEW FISHERMEN

Storm?

(They shade their eyes looking out to sea.)


BALSTRODE 

(glass to his eye)

A long way out. Sea horses.
The wind is holding back the tide.
If it veers round, watch for your lives.

CHORUS OF FISHERS

And if the spring tide eats the land again
Till even the cottages and cobbled walls of fishermen
Are billets for the thievish waves which take
As if in sleep, thieving for thieving's sake -  

(The Rector comes down the High Street. He is 
followed as always by the Borough's second most 
famous rentier, the widow, Mrs. (Nabob) Sedley. From 
"The Boar" come the two 'nieces' who give Auntie her 
nickname. They stand in front of the pub taking the 
morning sun. Ned Keene, seeing Mrs. Sedley, pops out 
of his shop door.)


RECTOR 

(right and left)

Good morning, good morning!

NIECES

Good morning!

MRS. SEDLEY

Good morning, dear Rector.

NED

Had Auntie no nieces we'd never respect her.  

SWALLOW

Good morning! Good morning!

NIECES

Good morning!

MRS. SEDLEY

Good morning, your worship, Mr. Swallow.

AUNTIE 

(to Keene)

You jeer, but if they wink you're eager to follow!

(The Rector and Mrs. Sedley continue towards 
the church.)


NED 

(shouts across to Auntie)

I'm coming tonight to see your nieces.

AUNTIE 

(dignified)

The Boar is at its patron's service.

BOLES

God's storm will drown your hot desires!  

BALSTRODE

God stay the tide, or I shall share your fears.  

CHORUS

For us sea-dwellers, this sea-birth can be
Death to our gardens of fertility.
Yet only such contemptuous springtide can
Tickle the virile impotence of man.

PETER 

(calls off)

Hi! Give us a hand!

(Chorus stops.)


Haul the boat!

BOLES 

(shouts back)

Haul it yourself, Grimes!

PETER 

(off)

Hi! Somebody bring the rope!

(Nobody does. Presently he appears and takes the 
capstan rope himself and pulls it after him [off] to the 
boat. Then he returns. The fishermen and women turn 
their backs on him and slouch away awkwardly.)


BALSTRODE 

(going to capstan)

I'll give a hand, the tide is near the turn.

NED

(Going to capstan.)

We'll drown the gossips in a tidal storm.

(Peter Grimes goes back to the boat. Balstrode 
and Keene turn the capstan.)


AUNTIE 

(at the door of the Boar)

Parsons may moralise and fools decide,
But a good publican takes neither side.

BALSTRODE

O haul away! The tide is near the turn.

NED

Man invented morals but tides have none.

BOLES 

(with arms akimbo watches their labour)

This lost soul of a fisherman must be
Shunned by respectable society.
Oh let the captains hear, let the scholars learn:
Shielding the sin, they share the people's scorn.

AUNTIE

I have my business. 
Let the preachers learn:
Hell may be fiery 
but the pub won't burn.

BALSTRODE, NED

The tide that floods will ebb, the tide, the tide will turn.

(The boat is hauled up. Grimes appears.)


NED

Grimes, you won't need help from now.
I've got a prentice for you.

BALSTRODE

A workhouse brat?

NED

I called at the workhouse yesterday.
All you do now is fetch the boy.
We'll send the carter with a note.
He'll bring your bargain on his cart.

(shouts)


Jim Hobson, we've a job for you.

HOBSON 

(enters)

Cart's full sir. More than I can do.

NED

Listen, Jim. You'll go to the workhouse
And ask for Mr. Keene his purchase.
Bring him back to Grimes.

HOBSON

Cart's full sir. I have no room.

NED

Hobson, you'll do what there is to be done.

(It is near enough to an argument to attract 
a crowd. Fishermen and women gather
round. Boles takes his chance.)


BOLES

Is this a Christian country?
Are pauper children so enslaved
That their bodies go for cash?

NED

Hobson, will you do your job?

(Ellen Orford has come in. She is a widow of about 40. 
Her children have died, or grown up and gone away, 
and in her loneliness she has become the Borough 
schoolmistress. A hard life has not hardened her. It 
has made her the more charitable.)


HOBSON

I have to go from pub to pub
Picking up parcels, standing about.
My journey back is late at night.
Mister, find some other way
To bring your boy back.

CHORUS

He's right. Dirty jobs!

HOBSON

Mister, find some other way...

ELLEN

Carter! I'll mind your passenger.

CHORUS

What! And be Grimes's messenger? You?

ELLEN

Whatever you say, I'm not ashamed.
Somebody must do the job.
The carter goes from pub to pub,
Picking up parcels, standing about.
The boy needs comfort late at night,
He needs a welcome on the road,
Coming here strange he'll be afraid.
I'll mind your passenger!

NED

Mrs. Orford is talking sense.

CHORUS

Ellen - you're leading us a dance,
Fetching boys of Peter Grimes,
Because the Borough is afraid
You who help will share the blame.

ELLEN

Whatever you say…
Let her among you without fault
Cast the first stone
And let the Pharisees and Sadducees
Give way to none.
But whosoever feels his pride
Humbled so deep
There is no corner he can hide
Even in sleep!
Will have no trouble to find out
How a poor teacher
Widowed and lonely finds delight
In shouldering care.

(as she moves up the street)


Mr. Hobson, where's your cart?
I'm ready.

HOBSON

Up here, ma'am. I can wait.

(The crowd stands round and watches. 
Some follow Ellen and Hobson. On the 
edge of the crowd are other activities.)


MRS. SEDLEY 

(whispers to Ned)

Have you my pills?

NED

I'm sorry, ma'am.

MRS. SEDLEY

My sleeping draught?

NED

The laudanum
Is out of stock, and being brought
By Mr. Carrier Hobson's cart.
He's back tonight.

MRS. SEDLEY

Good Lord, good Lord -

NED

Meet us both at this pub, "The Boar"
Auntie's we call it. It's quite safe.

MRS. SEDLEY

I've never been in a pub in my life.

NED

You'll come?

MRS. SEDLEY

All right.

NED

Tonight?

MRS. SEDLEY

All right.

(She moves off up the street.)


NED

If the old dear takes much more laudanum
She'll land herself one day in Bedlam!

BALSTRODE 

(looks seaward through his glass)

Look! The storm cone!
The wind veers
In from the sea
At gale force.

CHORUS

Look out for squalls!
The wind veers
In from the sea
At gale force.
Make your boat fast!
Shutter your windows!
And bring in all the nets!

ALL

Now the flood tide
And the sea-horses
Will gallop over
The eroded coast
Flooding, flooding
Our seasonal fears.
Look! The storm cone
The wind veers.
A high tide coming
Will eat the land
A tide no breakwaters can withstand.
Fasten your boats. The springtide's here
With a gale behind.

CHORUS

Is there much to fear?

NED

Only for the goods you're rich in:
It won't drown your conscience, 
it might flood your kitchen.

BOLES 

(passionately)

God has his ways which are not ours:
His high tide swallows up the shores.
Repent!

NED

And keep your wife upstairs.

ALL

O Tide that waits for no man
Spare our coasts!

(There is a general exeunt - mostly through the swing 
doors of "The Boar". Dr. Crabbe's hat blows away, is 
rescued for him by Ned Keene, who bows him into the 
pub. Finally only Peter and Balstrode are left, Peter 
gazing seaward, Balstrode hesitating at the pub door.)


BALSTRODE

And do you prefer the storm
To Auntie's parlour and the rum?

PETER

I live alone. The habit grows.

BALSTRODE

Grimes, since you're a lonely soul
Born to blocks and spars and ropes
Why not try the wider sea
With merchantman or privateer?

PETER

I am native, rooted here.

BALSTRODE

Rooted by what?

PETER

By familiar fields,
Marsh and sand,
Ordinary streets,
Prevailing wind.

BALSTRODE

You'd slip these moorings if you had the mind.

PETER

By the shut faces
Of the Borough clans;
And by the kindness
Of a casual glance.

BALSTRODE

You'll find no comfort there.
When an urchin's quarrelsome
Brawling at his little games,
Mother stops him with a threat,
"You'll be sold to Peter Grimes!"

PETER

Selling me new apprentices,
Children taught to be ashamed
Of the legend on their faces -
"You've been sold to Peter Grimes!"

BALSTRODE

Then the Crowner sits to
Hint, but not to mention crimes,
And publishes an open verdict
Whispered about this "Peter Grimes".
Your boy was workhouse starved -
Maybe you're not to blame he died.

PETER

Picture what that day was like
That evil day.
We strained into the wind
Heavily laden,
We plunged into the wave's
Shuddering challenge
Then the sea rose to a storm
Over the gunwales,
And the boy's silent reproach
Turned to illness.
Then home
Among fishing nets
Alone, alone, alone
With a childish death!

BALSTRODE

This storm is useful. You can speak your mind
And never mind the Borough commentary.
There is more grandeur in a gale of wind
To free confession, set a conscience free.

PETER

They listen to money
These Borough gossips
I have my visions
Fiery visions.
They call me dreamer
They scoff at my dreams
And my ambition.
But I know a way
To answer the Borough
I'll win them over.

BALSTRODE

With the new prentice?

PETER

We'll sail together.
These Borough gossips
Listen to money
Only to money:
I'll fish the sea dry,
Sell the good catches-
That wealthy merchant
Grimes will set up
Household and shop
You will all see it!
I'll marry Ellen!

BALSTRODE

Man - go and ask her
Without your booty,
She'll have you now.

PETER

No - not for pity!...

BALSTRODE

Then the old tragedy
Is in store:
New start with new prentice
Just as before.

PETER

What Peter Grimes decides
Is his affair.

BALSTRODE

You fool, man, fool!

(The wind has risen. Balstrode is shouting 
above it. Peter faces him angrily.)

PETER

Are you my conscience?

BALSTRODE

Might as well
Try shout the wind down as to tell
The obvious truth.

PETER

Take your advice -
Put it where your money is.

BALSTRODE

The storm is here. O come away.

PETER

The storm is here and I shall stay.

(The storm is rising. Auntie comes out of "The Boar" 
to fasten the shutters, in front of the windows. - 
Balstrode goes to help her.
- He looks back 
towards Peter, then goes into the pub.)


PETER

What harbour shelters peace?
Away from tidal waves, away from storm
What harbour can embrace
Terrors and tragedies?
With her there'll be no quarrels,
With her the mood will stay,
A harbour evermore
Where night is turned to day.

(The wind rises. He stands a moment as if 
leaning against the wind. Curtain.)
 

Interlude II

Storm


Scene 2


(Interior of "The Boar", typical main room of a 
country pub. No bar. Upright settles, tables, log fire. 
When the curtain rises Auntie is admitting Mrs. Sedley. 
The gale has risen to hurricane force and Auntie holds 
the door with difficulty against the wind which rattles 
the windows and howls in the chimney. They both push 
the door closed)
 

AUNTIE

Past time to close!

MRS. SEDLEY

He said half-past ten.

AUNTIE

Who?

MRS. SEDLEY

Mr. Keene.

AUNTIE

Him and his women!

MRS. SEDLEY

You referring to me?

AUNTIE

Not at all, not at all.
What do you want?

MRS. SEDLEY

Room from the storm.

AUNTIE

That is the sort of weak politeness
Makes a publican lose her clients.
Keep in the corner out of sight.

(Balstrode and a Fisherman enter. They struggle 
with the door.)


BALSTRODE

Phew, that's a bitch of a gale all right.

AUNTIE 

(nods her head towards Mrs. Sedley)

Sh-h-h.

BALSTRODE

Sorry. I didn't see you, missis.
You'll give the regulars a surprise.

AUNTIE

She's meeting Ned.

BALSTRODE

Which Ned?

AUNTIE

The quack.
He's looking after her heart attack.

BALSTRODE

Bring us a pint.

AUNTIE

It's closing time.

BALSTRODE

You fearful old female - 
why should you mind?

AUNTIE

The storm!

(Bob Boles and other fishermen enter. The wind howls 
through the door and again there is difficulty in closing 
it.)


BOLES

Did you hear the tide
Has broken over the Northern Road?

(He leaves the door open too long with disastrous 
consequences. A sudden gust howls through the door, 
the shutters of the window fly open, a plane blows in.)
 

BALSTRODE 

(shouts)

Get those shutters.

AUNTIE 

(screams)

O-o-o-o-o!

BALSTRODE

You fearful old female, why do you
Leave your windows naked?

AUNTIE

O-o-o-o-o!

BALSTRODE

Better strip a niece or two
And clamp your shutters!

(The two 'nieces' run in. They are young, pretty enough 
though a little worn, conscious that they are the chief 
attractions of "The Boar". At the moment they are in 
mild hysterics, having run downstairs in their night 
clothes, though with their unusual instinct for 
precaution they have found time to don each a wrap. 
It is not clear whether they are sisters, friends or simply 
colleagues: but they behave like twins, as though each 
has only half a personality and they cling together 
always to sustain their self-esteem.)


NIECES

Oo! Oo!
It's blown our bedroom windows in.
Oo! we'll all be drowned.

BALSTRODE

Perhaps in gin.

NIECES

I wouldn't mind if it didn't howl.
It gets on my nerves.

BALSTRODE

D'you think we
Should stop our storm for such as you -
Coming all over palpitations!
"Oo! Oo!"
Auntie, get some new relations.

AUNTIE 

(takes it ill)

Loud man, I never did have time
For the kind of creature who spits in his wine.
A joke's a joke and fun is fun,
But say your grace and be polite for all 
that we have done.

NIECES

For his peace of mind.

MRS. SEDLEY

This is no place for me!

AUNTIE

Loud man, you're glad enough to be
Playing your cards in our company.
A joke's a joke and fun is fun,
But say your grace and be polite for all 
that we have done.

NIECES

For his peace of mind.

MRS. SEDLEY

This is no place for me!

AUNTIE

Loud man!

(Some more fishermen and women come in. 
Usual struggle with the door.)

FISHERMAN

There's been a landslide up the coast.

BOLES 

(rising unsteadily)

I'm drunk. Drunk!

BALSTRODE

You're a Methody wastrel.

BOLES 

(staggers to one of the nieces)

Is this a niece of yours?

AUNTIE

That's so.

BOLES

Who's her father?

AUNTIE

Who wants to know?

BOLES

I want to pay my best respects
To the beauty and misery of her sex.

BALSTRODE

Old Methody, you'd better tune
You piety to another hymn.

BOLES

I want her!

BALSTRODE

Sh-h-h.

AUNTIE 

(cold)

Turn that man out.

BALSTRODE

He's the local preacher.
He's lost the way of carrying liquor.
He means no harm.

BOLES

No, I mean love!

BALSTRODE

Come on, boy!

(Boles hits him. Mrs. Sedley screams. Balstrode 
quietly overpowers Boles and sits him in a chair.)


BALSTRODE

We live and let live,
And look we keep our hands to ourselves.

(Boles struggles to his feet. Balstrode sits him 
down again, laying the law down.)


BALSTRODE

Pub conversation should depend
On this eternal moral;
So long as satire don't descend
To fisticuff or quarrel.
We live and let live, and look
We keep our hands to ourselves.

(And while Boles is being forced into 
his chair again, the bystanders comment)


CHORUS

We live and let live, and look
We keep our hands to ourselves.

BALSTRODE

We sit and drink the evening through
Not deigning to devote a
Thought to the daily cud we chew
But buying drinks by rota.

ALL

We live and let live, and look
We keep our hands to ourselves.

(Door opens. The struggle with the wind is worse 
than before as Ned Keene gets through.)


NED

Have you heard the cliff is down
Up by Grimes's hut?

AUNTIE

Where is he?

MRS. SEDLEY

Thank God you've come!

NED

You won't blow away.

MRS. SEDLEY

The carter's over half an hour late!  

BALSTRODE

He'll be later still: 
the road's under flood.

MRS. SEDLEY

I can't stay longer. I refuse.

NED

You'll have to stay if you want your pills.

MRS. SEDLEY

With drunken females and in brawls!

NED

They're Auntie's nieces, that's what they are,
And better than you for kissing, ma.
Mind that door!

ALL

Mind that door!

(The door opens again. Peter Grimes has come in. 
Unlike the rest he wears no oilskins. His hair looks 
wild. He advances into the room, shaking off the 
raindrops from his hair. Mrs. Sedley faints. 
ed Keene catches her as she falls.)


NED

Get the brandy, aunt.

AUNTIE

Who'll pay?

NED

Her. I'll charge her for it.

(As Peter moves forward the others shrink back.)


CHORUS

Talk of the devil and there he is
A devil he is, and a devil he is.
Grimes is waiting his apprentice.

NED

This widow's as strong as any two
Fishermen I have met.
Everybody's very quiet!

(No-one answers. Silence is broken by Peter, 
as if thinking aloud.)


PETER

Now the great Bear and Pleiades
where earth moves
Are drawing up the clouds
of human grief
Breathing solemnity in the deep night.
Who can decipher
In storm or starlight
The written character
of a friendly fate -
As the sky turns, the world for us to change?
But if the horoscope's
bewildering
Like a flashing turmoil
of a shoal of herring,
Who can turn skies back and begin again?  

(Silence again. Then muttering in undertones.)


CHORUS

He's mad or drunk.
Why's that man here?

NIECES

His song alone would sour the beer.

CHORUS

His temper's up.
O chuck him out.

NIECES

I wouldn't mind if he didn't howl.

CHORUS

He looks as though he's nearly drowned.

BOLES 

(staggers up to Grimes)

You've sold your soul, Grimes.

BALSTRODE

Come away.

BOLES

Satan's got no hold on me.

BALSTRODE

Leave him alone, you drunkard.

(Goes to get hold of Boles.)


BOLES

I'll hold the gospel light before
The cataract that blinds his eyes.

PETER 

(as the drunk stumbles up to him)

Get out.

(Grimes thrusts Boles aside roughly and turns away.)


BOLES

His exercise
Is not with men but killing boys.

(Boles picks up a bottle and is about to bring it down 
on Grimes's head when Balstrode knocks it out of his 
hand and it crashes in fragments on the floor.)


AUNTIE

For God's sake, help me keep the peace.
D'you want me up at the next Assize?

BALSTRODE

For peace sake, someone start a song.

(Keene starts a round.)


AUNTIE

That's right, Ned!

(The round is)


ALL

Old Joe has gone fishing and
Young Joe has gone fishing and
You Know has gone fishing and
Found them a shoal.
Pull them in handfuls,
And in canfuls,
And in panfuls
Bring them in sweetly,
Gut them completely,
Pack them up neatly,
Sell them discretely,
Oh, haul a-way.

(Peter comes into the round: the others stop.)


PETER

When I had gone fishing
When he had gone fishing
When You Know's gone fishing
We found us Davy Jones.
Bring him in with horror!
Bring him in with terror!
And bring him in with sorrow!
Oh, haul a-way.

(This breaks the round, but the others recover in a 
repeat. At the climax of the round the door opens 
to admit Ellen Orford, the boy and the carrier. All 
three are soaking, muddy and bedraggled.)
 

HOBSON

The bridge is down, 
we half swam over.  

NED

And your cart? Is it seaworthy?

(The women go to Ellen and the boy. Auntie 
fusses over them. Boles reproaches.)


ELLEN

We're chilled to the bone.

BOLES 

(to Ellen)

Serves you right, woman.

AUNTIE

My dear
There's brandy and hot water to spare.

NIECES

Let's look at the boy.

ELLEN 

(rising)

Let him be.

NIECES 

(admiring)

Nice sweet thing.

ELLEN 

(protecting him)

Not for such as you.

PETER

Let's go. You ready?

AUNTIE

Let them warm up
They've been half drowned.

PETER

Time to get off.

AUNTIE

Your hut's washed away.

PETER

Only the cliff.
Young prentice, come.

(The Boy hesitates, Ellen leads him to Peter.)


ELLEN

Goodbye, my dear, God bless you.
Peter will take you home.

ALL

Home? Do you call that home?

(Peter takes the boy out the door into the howling 
storm. Curtain.)

PRÓLOGO


(Interior del Salón Moot, dispuesto para la 
investigación del juez. El juez, Sr. Swallow, 
en una mesa sobre tarima, el secretario abajo. 
La multitud se mantiene detrás por medio de 
Hobson, que actúa como guardia. El Sr. Swallow 
es el principal abogado del Borough y al tiempo 
es el alcalde y el juez. Hombre de excepcional 
carrera y talentos, sin embargo desconcierta a 
los ciudadanos con su aire indeciso)
 

HOBSON
 
(grita)

¡Peter Grimes!

(Peter Grimes se adelanta de entre la multitud.)


SWALLOW

(leyendo)

Peter Grimes, estamos aquí para investigar 
la causa de la muerte de tu aprendiz, 
William Spode, cuyo cuerpo trajiste a tierra 
en tu barco, "El niño Billy", el pasado día 26. 
¿Consientes en prestar declaración?

(Peter asiente.)
 

Sube al estrado, Peter Grimes.
Haz el juramento.
Repite conmigo. "Juro por Dios Todopoderoso".

PETER

"Juro por Dios Todopoderoso"

SWALLOW

"Que el testimonio que voy a dar"

PETER

"Que el testimonio que voy a dar"

SWALLOW

"Será la verdad"

PETER

"Será la verdad"

SWALLOW

"Toda la verdad y nada más que la verdad."

PETER

"Toda la verdad y nada más que la verdad."

SWALLOW

Cuenta la historia con tus propias palabras.

(Peter permanece callado.)
 

Según parece, zarpaste con tu bote
con la intención de llegar a Londres. 
¿Por qué lo hiciste?

PETER

Obtuvimos un enorme copo,
demasiado grande como para venderlo aquí.

SWALLOW

Y el chico... ¿murió en el camino?

PETER

El viento roló en contra... nos salimos de la ruta.
El agua potable se agotó...

SWALLOW

¿Cuánto tiempo estuvisteis en la mar?

PETER

Tres días.

SWALLOW

Y después, ¿qué pasó?

PETER

El chico murió... tendido sobre el pescado.

SWALLOW

¿Y tú, qué hiciste?

PETER

Tiré todo por la borda y puse rumbo a casa.

SWALLOW

¿Tiraste el pescado por la borda?... 
Y cuando llegaste a tierra ¿pediste ayuda?

PETER

Llamé a Ned Keene.

SWALLOW

¿El farmacéutico aquí presente?

(señala a Ned)
 

¿Hubo alguien más?

PETER

También vino el reverendo.

SWALLOW

¿Quieres decir el reverendo, Horace Adams?

(El reverendo se adelanta y Swallow 
le indica que regrese a su sitio.)
 

Gracias, Sr. Adams.

(Vuelve a Peter.)
 

Creo que tu llegada produjo un cierto alboroto.

PETER

Bob Boles empezó a gritar.

SWALLOW

Y que hubo un tumulto en la calle,
del cual nuestra tabernera te rescató...

PETER

Sí, la Tía.

SWALLOW

No la llamamos así aquí... 
Y luego insultaste a una respetable señora...

(Peter mira.)
 

Responde... ¿Insultaste a gritos a cierta persona?

(La Sra. Sedley se adelanta. Es la viuda de un 
agente jubilado de la Compañía de las Indias 
Orientales y se la conoce como la Sra. Nabob. 
Tiene 65 años, presumida, fisgona e impopular.)


SRA. SEDLEY

¡Diga a quién!... ¡A quién!

SWALLOW

La Sra. Sedley... aquí presente.

PETER 

(furioso)

No me gustan las entrometidas.

(Un ligero murmullo entre los espectadores se va 
convirtiendo poco a poco en un coro confuso, un 
rumor inarticulado.)


CORO

Cuando las mujeres cuchichean, 
el resultado es que alguien no duerme.

HOBSON
 
(gritando)

¡Silencio!

SWALLOW

Ahora dime. 
¿Quién te ayudó a llevar al chico a casa?
¿La maestra, la viuda... la Sra. Ellen Orford? 

(nuevo murmullo. Ellen se adelanta)


MUJERES

¡Ay! Cuando rezas, cierras los ojos,
y no se distingue la verdad de la mentira.

HOBSON 

(grita)

¡Silencio!

SWALLOW

Sra. Orford, siendo usted maestra y viuda,
¿cómo se vio envuelta en esto?

ELLEN

Sólo quería ayudar.

SWALLOW

¿Y por qué debería ayudar a este tipo,
grosero, brutal y soez?

(a Grimes)
 

Pero hay algo que quizá hable en tu favor...
Creo que salvaste al chico de morir ahogado
durante las tormentas de marzo.

(Peter está callado.)
 

¿Tienes algo más que decir?...
¿No?... Entonces yo sí.
Peter Grimes, te aconsejo lo siguiente: 
no tomes a otro niño como aprendiz. 
Contrata a un hombre, a un pescador.
Nuestro veredicto es que William Spode, 
tu aprendiz, murió en circunstancias accidentales. 
Pero ésta es la clase de cosas 
que la gente no olvida.

CORO

Pero cuando la ley da carpetazo,
¿quién se atreverá a echarle la culpa?

HOBSON 

(gritando)

¡Silencio! ¡Silencio!

(Peter ha avanzado e intenta hablar.)
 

PETER

¡Señoría! Como cualquier otro pescador,
tengo que contratar un aprendiz. Necesito ayuda.

SWALLOW

Entonces, busca una mujer que te cuide.

PETER

Eso es lo que quiero, pero... aún no...

SWALLOW

¿Por qué no?

PETER

No, hasta que cesen las habladurías...

(El murmullo empieza de nuevo.)


SWALLOW
 
(haciendo un gesto de disgusto)

¡Retírate! Despejen la sala. ¡Retírate!

PETER

"Retírate", dice usted... ¡Se lava las manos!
El caso está en la memoria de la gente.
Los cargos, que el tribunal no ha hecho,
me los gritarán en la cara.
¡Déjeme hablar, déjeme defenderme!
Traiga a los que me acusan...
Déjeme que les diga a la cara la verdad, 
la simple verdad... ¡y así poder cerrar sus bocas!

(Las últimas palabras las grita)
 

CORO

Cuando las mujeres chismorrean, 
alguien no duerme por la noche.
Pero cuando la ley dice la última palabra,
¿quién se atreve a contradecirla?

(A todos ellos el guardia Hobson les grita)
 

HOBSON

¡Despejen la sala!

(Swallow se levanta con solemnidad y sale 
ceremoniosamente. La multitud empieza a salir. 
Peter y Ellen se quedan solos.)


PETER

La verdad... la pena... y la verdad.

ELLEN

¡Peter, vámonos!

PETER

En este nido de malvados,
hasta las paredes murmuran...

ELLEN

También nosotros murmuraremos,
hablaremos y descansaremos.

PETER

¿Mientras todos 
te miran y murmuran cuando pasas?
Es que deseas que tu nombre 
sea también proscrito?

ELLEN

Peter, 
recobrarás tu buen nombre.
Nuevamente serás estimado por todos.

PETER

Hasta que el odio del Borough
te envenene a ti también.

ELLEN

Habrá nuevos bancos en donde pescar
y la vida será más fácil.

PETER

¡Ay, los bancos de fantasmas de ahogados!
El tiempo no olvida,
los muertos son nuestros testigos
y el destino ciego.

ELLEN

El cálido sol
en un cielo sin nubes,
desparramará sus rayos.

AMBOS

En medio del dolor,
tu/mi voz es como una mano extendida
que al estrecharla 
me/te hace saber que tengo/tienes un amigo/a.

(Salen lentamente mientras el telón cae.)


Interludio 1


Amanecer
 


ACTO I 


Escena 1

(Por la mañana, unos días mas tarde. 
Exterior del Salón Moot, la siguiente puerta 
es "The Boar". La farmacia de Ned Keene 
está en la esquina de la calle. Dos pescadores
están voceando en su bote. Gritos prolongados 
mientras el bote es arrastrado a la orilla. Las 
mujeres vienen de remendar las redes y de 
recoger los cestos de pescado. El capitán 
Balstrode está sentado sobre el rompeolas 
mirando al mar. Balstrode es capitán retirado 
de la marina mercante, experimentado como 
hombre que ha viajado, pero con una simpatía 
general que le hace el rentista preferido de 
todo el Borough. Ceremoniosamente mastica 
tabaco mientras mira)


CORO DE PESCADORES Y MUJERES

¡Oh, míseras mujeres, colgad de vuestras puertas 
los corchos y las redes cien veces remendadas!
Dad la bienvenida a vuestros cansados esposos
que regresan fatigados de la mar.

PESCADORES

Empapados y castigados por el oleaje, 
que golpea sin cesar la alquitranada amura.
Nuestras almas sólo encuentran calor
en la ginebra de las tabernas.

(Varios pescadores cruzan hacia "The Boar", 
donde la Tía espera en el umbral.)


PESCADORES

¡Tía!

TÍA

Pasen, caballeros, pasen.

BOLES

¡Sus barriles rebosan ginebra envenenada!

(Boles, el pescador metodista, permanece al 
margen del grupo, sin beber)


PESCADOR

¡Boles se ha hecho metodista!

(le señala con el dedo y ríe.)


TÍA

Un hombre debe tener aficiones 
para que le alegren en sus ratos libres.

(Algunos pescadores entran en "The Boar", otros 
se quedan con sus mujeres en las redes)


MUJERES

Niños medio desnudos juguetean en la orilla;
nadan entre los barcos, se suben a las jarcias, 
o juegan con los remos de una barca.
Así es como se familiarizan con la mar.

(Mientras los pescadores arrastran un segundo 
bote, los niños juegan en el primero)


BALSTRODE

¡Fuera de ahí, pequeños percebes!
¡Levad anclas, izad las velas!

(Balstrode los echa del bote. Un personaje 
respetable aparece por High Street. Las gorras 
se levantan a su paso mientras él se dirige 
directamente a "The Boar")


Pescador
 
(tocándose la gorra)

Dr. Crabbe.

BOLES
 
(señalándolo según se cierra la puerta del bar)

¡Ese brinda a la salud de todos los males!

OTRO PESCADOR

¿Se avecina una tormenta?

UNOS CUANTOS PESCADORES

¿Una tormenta?

(Hacen sombra en los ojos mirando al mar.)


BALSTRODE
 
(con el catalejo en el ojo)

Olas con espuma... a bastante distancia aún.
El viento la contiene, pero si rola,
temed por vuestras vidas.

PESCADORES

La marea viva engullirá de nuevo la tierra, 
llevándose cabañas y muros de piedra,
como un ladrón que roba
por el placer de robar.

(El párroco viene calle abajo. Le sigue, como 
siempre, la segunda rentista más famosa del 
Borough, la viuda, Sra. (Nabob) Sedley. De The 
Boar vienen las dos 'sobrinas' que le dan a la Tía 
su apodo. Se quedan frente a la taberna, tomando 
el sol de la mañana. Ned Keene, al ver a la Sra. 
Sedley, sale por la puerta de su tienda)


PÁRROCO
 
(a derecha e izquierda)

¡Buenos días, buenos días!

SOBRINAS

¡Buenos días!

SRA. SEDLEY

Buenos días, querido párroco.

NED

Si no fuera por ese par de sobrinas...

SWALLOW

¡Buenos días! ¡Buenos días!

SOBRINAS

¡Buenos días!

SRA. SEDLEY

Buenos días tenga usted, Sr. Swallow.

TÍA
 
(a Keene)

Sí, sí, pero cuando te miran... ¡vas tras ellas!

(El párroco y la Sra. Sedley siguen hacia 
la iglesia.)


NED
 
(gritando desde el otro lado a la tía)

¡Iré esta noche a ver a sus sobrinas!

TÍA
 
(con dignidad)

"El Jabalí" está al servicio de los clientes.

BOLES

¡La tormenta divina ahogará tus sucios deseos!

BALSTRODE

Si la tormenta llega, lo pasaremos igual de mal.

CORO

Para nosotros, gente de mar, este temporal
significará la ruina de nuestros cultivos.
¿Será posible que ante la dura tormenta
nuestra virilidad adormecida despierte?

PETER 

(llamando desde fuera)

¡Eh! ¡Echadme una mano!

(El coro calla)


¡Ayudadme a arrastrad el bote!

BOLES 

(grita en respuesta)

¡Arrástralo tú mismo, Grimes!

PETER
 
(fuera)

¡Eh! ¡Que alguien traiga un cabo!

(Nadie lo hace. Peter aparece y coge la cuerda 
del cabestrante él mismo y la arrastra tras sí 
hacia el barco. Luego vuelve. Los pescadores 
y las mujeres le vuelven la espalda)


BALSTRODE
 
(yendo al cabestrante)

¡Yo te echaré una mano, la marea va a cambiar!

NED

(Va al cabestrante.)

¡Ahogaremos los cuchicheos en la tormenta!

(Peter Grimes vuelve al barco. Balstrode y 
Keene giran el cabestrante.)

TÍA
 
(a la puerta del "Jabalí")

Que los curas moralicen y los locos decidan,
pero un buen tabernero no toma partido.

BALSTRODE

¡Oh, tirad! ¡La marea va a cambiar!

NED

El hombre se rige por reglas, pero la mar no.

BOLES
 
(con brazos en jarras los observa trabajar)

Ese pescador tiene el alma como un tizón.
¡Todos deberíamos cerrarle las puertas!
¡Que lo sepan los capitanes, que lo sepan todos!
El desprecio también alcanzará a quien lo ayude.

TÍA

Yo tengo mi negocio. 
Que aprendan los predicadores: 
el infierno puede ser atroz, 
pero la taberna no se quemará.

BALSTRODE, NED

¡La marea está a punto de arrollarlo todo!

(El barco es varado en tierra. Aparece Grimes.)


NED

Grimes, a partir de ahora ya no necesitarás ayuda.
Tengo un aprendiz para ti.

BALSTRODE

¿Un sinvergüenza del hospicio?

NED

Llamé al hospicio ayer.
Sólo tienes que recoger al chico.
Enviaremos al carretero con un nota
y él te traerá tu ganga en la carreta.

(gritando)


¡Jim Hobson, tenemos un trabajo para ti!

HOBSON
 
(entra)

La carreta está llena, señor. No puedo ayudarle.

NED

Escucha, Jim. Irás al orfanato y preguntarás
por la compra del Sr. Keene.
Luego se la traes a Grimes.

HOBSON

La carreta está llena, señor. No tengo sitio.

NED

Hobson, tú harás lo que yo te diga.

(La charla se parece lo suficiente a una discusión 
como para atraer a la gente. Pescadores y 
mujeres se reúnen en torno a ellos)


BOLES

¿Es esto un país cristiano?
¿Los niños pobres son tratados como esclavos 
y sus cuerpos se pagan en metálico?

NED

Hobson, ¿vas a hacer el trabajo, sí o no?

(Ellen Orford ha entrado. Es una viuda de unos 
40 años. Sus hijos han muerto o han crecido y se 
han ido, y en su soledad se ha convertido en la 
maestra del Borough. La dura vida no la ha 
endurecido sino que la ha hecho más caritativa.)


HOBSON

Tengo que ir de taberna en taberna
recogiendo paquetes, esperando, aquí y allá.
Regresaré muy entrada la noche.
¿Por qué no busca otra manera
de traer aquí a su chico?

CORO

Tiene razón. ¡Qué trabajo tan engorroso!

HOBSON

¿Por qué no busca otro modo...

ELLEN

¡Carretero, yo cuidaré de tu pasajero!

CORO

¿Qué? ¿Y ser la mensajera de Grimes?... ¿Tú?

ELLEN

Digan lo que digan, no me avergüenzo.
Alguien tiene que hacer el trabajo.
El carretero va de taberna en taberna
recogiendo paquetes, de aquí para allá.
El chico no sabrá a donde lo llevan,
necesita que alguien lo acoja,
tendrá miedo cuando anochezca.
¡Yo cuidaré de su pasajero!

NED

Lo que dice la Sra. Orford es muy sensato.

CORO

Ellen, estás desafiando a todo el pueblo
al prestarte a ayudar a Peter Grimes;
porque si lo haces, 
acabarás siendo tan culpable como él.

ELLEN

Digan lo que digan, no me importa...
¡Aquel que esté libre de pecado
que tire la primera piedra!
¡Dejad que los fariseos y saduceos
se crean los mejores!
Pero quien sienta su orgullo tan humillado 
que no encuentre una esquina 
en la que se pueda esconder,
ni siquiera cuando duerme,
comprenderá fácilmente 
por qué una humilde maestra,
viuda y solitaria, 
encuentra solaz ayudando a los demás.

(comienza a caminar calle arriba)


Sr. Hobson, ¿dónde está su carro?
Estoy preparada.

HOBSON

Allí arriba, señora. No tenga prisa.

(La multitud contempla la escena. Algunos 
siguen a Ellen; al otro lado, una escena 
diferente está teniendo lugar)


SRA. SEDLEY 

(susurra a Ned)

¿Tiene mis píldoras?

NED

Lo siento, señora, no.

SRA. SEDLEY

¿Y mi bálsamo para dormir?

NED

El láudano se ha acabado.
Lo traerá el Sr. Hobson
en su carro.
Esta noche 

SRA. SEDLEY

¡Ay, Dios mío!

NED

Reúnase con nosotros en la taberna, de la Tía.
"El Jabalí" es un lugar acogedor.

SRA. SEDLEY

No he estado en una taberna en mi vida.

NED

¿Vendrá?

SRA. SEDLEY

De acuerdo.

NED

¿Esta noche?

SRA. SEDLEY

De acuerdo.

(Sube calle arriba)


NED

¡Si la vieja sigue tomando láudano,
acabará en el manicomio!

BALSTRODE
 
(mirando al mar con su catalejo)

¡Mirad!... ¡El ojo de la tormenta!
El viento rola
desde el mar
con la fuerza de una galerna

CORO

¡Cuidado con el huracán!
El viento rola
desde el mar
con la fuerza de una galerna.
¡Asegurad los botes!
¡Clavad las ventanas!
¡Recoged todas las redes!

TODOS

La pleamar hará que
las olas espumeantes
galopen sobre las rocas
de la erosionada costa
inundando con furor
todos nuestros temores.
¡Mirad! ¡El viento hace virar
el ojo de la tormenta!
La arbolada mar
engullirá nuestras costas...
¡Ningún rompeolas podrá resistir!
¡Asegurad los botes!
¡La marea se acerca con la fuerza de un huracán!

CORO

¿Habrá muchos destrozos?

NED

Teme sólo por aquello que te hace rico.
No ahogará tu conciencia, 
pero podría inundar tu cocina.

BOLES
 
(apasionadamente)

Los caminos del Señor son insondables.
Él nos envía la marea que engullirá nuestra costa.
¡Arrepentios!

NED

¡Y poned a vuestra mujer en el piso de arriba!

HOMBRES

¡Oh, tormenta que no respetas a nadie,
perdona nuestras costas!

(Hay una desbandada general a través de las 
puertas batientes de "El Jabalí". El viento 
arranca el sombrero del Dr. Crabbe; lo coge 
Ned, se lo devuelve y ambos entran en la taberna. 
Sólo Peter y Balstrode quedan en escena)


BALSTRODE

¿Y prefieres la tormenta a la charla y al ron
de la taberna de la Tía?

PETER

Vivo solo... Estoy acostumbrado.

BALSTRODE

Grimes, puesto que eres un alma solitaria
que vives entre jarcias, mástiles y cabos,
¿por qué no intentar el ancho mar
como mercante o corsario?

PETER

Nací aquí... estas son mis raíces.

BALSTRODE

¿Raíces?... ¿Qué raíces?

PETER

La campiña que nos rodea,
las playas y marismas,
las calles, cientos de veces recorridas,
el viento que no cesa de soplar...

BALSTRODE

Si quisieras, podrías soltar todo ese lastre.

PETER

... los rostros enjutos
de las familias del Borough;
la amabilidad de una mirada 
al pasar...

BALSTRODE

No encontrará descanso aquí.
Cuando un golfillo peleón
hace alguna travesura,
¿qué le dice su madre para asustarlo?
"Te voy a vender a Peter Grimes".

PETER

Todos los aprendices que me venden
llevan marcados en sus caras
la leyenda de la vergüenza:
"Me han vendido a Peter Grimes"

BALSTRODE

El juez ha dictado una sentencia ambigua, 
en donde sin llegar a culparte directamente 
de ningún delito, sí da a entender que tuviste
cierta responsabilidad en la muerte del chico.
Aquel niño ya venía enfermo del orfanato, 
no fue tuya la culpa de su muerte.

PETER

Nadie se imagina lo que fue ese día,
ese maldito día.
La furia del viento nos arrastraba,
la barca iba cargada hasta la borda,
nos hundíamos una y otra vez
entre las gigantescas olas.
La furia de la tormenta 
barría la cubierta.
El chico se encontraba mal
y en su mirada había 
un silencioso reproche.
Y luego, 
¡el regreso a casa con un niño 
muerto entre las redes!

BALSTRODE

Lo bueno de esta tormenta 
es que puedes hablar libremente
sin que te importe lo que en el Borough se diga.
¡La galerna limpiará hasta nuestra conciencia!

PETER

A esos murmuradores del Borough
sólo les importa el dinero.
Yo tengo mis sueños,
sueños apasionados.
Me llaman soñador,
se ríen de mis sueños
y de mis ambiciones.
Pero conozco una forma
de enfrentarme al Borough
y volver a ganar su confianza.

BALSTRODE

¿Con el nuevo aprendiz?

PETER

Navegaremos juntos.
Esos murmuradores del Borough
sólo escuchan al dinero,
sólo al dinero.
Pescaré mar adentro
y venderé todo lo que capture.
Una vez rico,
Grimes, abrirá
casa y negocio.
¡Todos lo veréis!
¡Por último, me casaré con Ellen!

BALSTRODE

Amigo, ve y pídeselo ahora mismo,
no es necesario que seas rico
para que ella te acepte.

PETER

¡No, no quiero que me acepte por lástima!...

BALSTRODE

Entonces la vieja tragedia 
se repetirá.
Con el nuevo aprendiz 
sucederá igual que con el otro.

PETER

Lo que Peter Grimes decida
sólo es asunto suyo.

BALSTRODE

¡Estás equivocado, amigo, por completo!

(Se ha levantado el viento y Balstrode tiene 
que gritar. Peter se le encara agriamente.)


PETER

¿Acaso eres mi conciencia?

BALSTRODE

Podría serlo.
Intenta gritar al viento 
y decirle la cruda verdad.

PETER

Coge tu consejo
y ponlo donde está tu dinero.

BALSTRODE

La tormenta está aquí. ¡Oh, vámonos!

PETER

Sí, la tormenta está aquí y yo me quedo.

(La tormenta crece. La Tía sale de "El Jabalí"
para asegurar las contraventanas. Balstrode va
a ayudarla. Mira hacia atrás a Peter y luego 
entran en la taberna)
 

PETER

¿Qué puerto puede ofrecerme reposo?
Lejos de las corrientes, lejos de las tormentas,
¿qué puerto puede protegernos
de los terrores y tragedias?
Con ella ya no habrá problemas,
con ella siempre tendré paz,
un puerto donde refugiarme para siempre,
donde la noche siempre sea día.

(El viento aumenta y Peter se queda un momento 
como si estuviera apoyado en el viento. Telón)


Interludio II

Tormenta
 

Escena 2


(Interior de "El Jabalí". No hay barra. Bancos 
rectos, mesas, chimenea. Cuando se alza el telón,
la Tía está recibiendo a la Sra. Sedley. La 
tormenta ha crecido hasta ser huracán y la Tía 
sujeta la puerta con dificultad a causa del viento,
que hace golpetear las ventanas y aúlla en la 
chimenea. Ambas empujan la puerta y la cierran)


TÍA

¡Hace rato que el bar está cerrado!

SRA. SEDLEY

Ha dicho que a las diez y media.

TÍA

¿Quién?

SRA. SEDLEY

El Sr. Keene.

TÍA

¡Él y sus mujeres!

SRA. SEDLEY

¿Se refiere a mí?

TÍA

En absoluto, en absoluto.
¿Qué quiere?

SRA. SEDLEY

Cobijo de la tormenta.

TÍA

Ésa es la clase de amabilidad
que le hace a un tabernero perder clientes.
Quédese en ese rincón, donde nadie la vea.

(Balstrode y un pescador entran abriendo la 
puerta con dificultad)


BALSTRODE

¡Fuu!.. ¡Es una tempestad de puta madre!

TÍA
 
(mueve la cabeza en dirección a la Sra. Sedley)

¡Ssshh!...

BALSTRODE

Perdón. No la había visto, señora.
Le va a dar una sorpresa a los parroquianos.

TÍA

Está esperando a Ned.

BALSTRODE

¿Qué Ned?

TÍA

El curandero.
Está cuidando de su ataque al corazón.

BALSTRODE

Ponme una pinta.

TÍA

Es la hora de cerrar.

BALSTRODE

Vieja temerosa, 
¿qué es lo que te sucede hoy?

TÍA

¡La tormenta!

(Bob Boles y otros pescadores entran. 
El viento aúlla en la puerta y otra vez es 
difícil cerrarla)


BOLES

¿Sabéis que la marea
ha inundado la carretera del norte?

(Deja la puerta abierta y una violenta ráfaga se 
cuela por ella; los postigos se abren de par en 
par estallando un cristal)


BALSTRODE
 
(grita)

¡Cerrad esas contraventanas!

TÍA 

(chilla)

¡Uh-uh-uh-uh!

BALSTRODE

Vieja temerosa, ¿por qué
tienes las ventanas sin protección?

TÍA

¡Uh-uh-uh-uh!

BAL
STRODE
¡Mejor sería que te preocuparas de las ventanas 
en lugar de hacedlo de tus sobrinas!

(Aparecen las dos "sobrinas". Son jóvenes 
y bonitas pero entradas en años, conscientes 
de que son las principales atracciones de 
"El Jabalí". Están algo histéricas, han bajado 
las escaleras en camisón, aunque han encontrado 
tiempo para arroparse con un chal. No está claro 
si son hermanas, amigas o simplemente colegas, 
pero se comportan como gemelas, cada una se 
apoya siempre en la otra para sostener su 
autoestima)
 

SOBRINAS

¡Ah! ¡Ah!
¡El huracán ha abierto nuestras ventanas!...
¡Aaaah! ¡Nos ahogaremos todos!

BALSTRODE

Seguramente... ¡en ginebra!

SOBRINAS

No soporto el ulular del viento...
¡Me pone histérica!

BALSTRODE

¿Creéis que deberíamos parar nuestra tormenta 
por alguien como vosotras?
¡Me dais risa!
"¡Aaaah! ¡Aaaaah!"
Tía, ¡consiga nuevos parientes!

TÍA
 
(se lo toma a mal)

¡Maleducado! Nunca me han gustado
los que escupen en el vino
que luego se han de beber.
Una broma es una broma, de acuerdo,
pero debería tener usted más educación.

SOBRINAS 

¡Tranquilícese!

SRA. SEDLEY

¡Éste no es lugar para mí!

TÍA

A pesar de ser un grosero, tiene la suerte
de jugar a las cartas en nuestra compañía.
Comprendo que una broma es una broma, 
pero debería ser más respetuoso 
y comportarse con educación.

SOBRINAS

¡Tranquilícese!

SRA. SEDLEY

¡Éste no es lugar para mí!

TÍA

¡Maleducado!

(Entran unos cuantos pescadores y mujeres que
así mismo deben luchar con la puerta)


PESCADOR

¡Ha habido un corrimiento de tierras en la costa!

BOLES
 
(se levanta tambaleándose)
 
¡Estoy borracho! ¡Borracho!

BALSTRODE

Eres un metodista libertino.

BOLES 

(tambaleándose junto a una de las sobrinas)

¿Es ésta sobrina suya?

TÍA

Así es.

BOLES

¿Quién es su padre?

TÍA

¿Y a usted qué le importa?

BOLES

Quiero ofrecer mis respetos
a la belleza y a la miseria de su sexo.

BALSTRODE

Viejo metodista, mejor sería que se dedicara
a cantar uno de sus himnos.

BOLES

¡La quiero!

BALSTRODE

Sshhh.

TÍA
 
(con frialdad)

Haced que se calle ese hombre.

BALSTRODE

Es el predicador local.
No está acostumbrado a beber.
No es peligroso.

BOLES

¡No, lo que quiero es amor!

BALSTRODE

¡Vamos, hombre!

(Boles le da un golpe. La Sra. Sedley grita. 
Balstrode lo domina y lo sienta en una silla.)


BALSTRODE

¡Vive y deja vivir!
No te metas donde no te llaman.

(Boles intenta levantarse pero Balstrode, 
con autoridad, lo sienta de nuevo)


BALSTRODE

Las conversaciones de taberna deben siempre 
respetar la siguiente ley:
haz todas las bromas que quieras, pero sin llegar
a los puñetazos o a los insultos.
¡Vive y deja vivir!
No te metas donde no te llaman.

(Y mientras obligan a Boles a sentarse en su 
silla de nuevo, los espectadores comentan)


CORO

¡Vive y deja vivir!
No te metas donde no te llaman.

BALSTRODE

Nos sentamos y bebemos toda la tarde,
sin que dediquemos un solo pensamiento 
al penoso quehacer de cada día.
Y así ronda tras ronda...

TODOS

¡Vive y deja vivir!
No te metas donde no te llaman.

(La puerta se abre. La pelea con la puerta y el 
viento es aún peor que antes. Ned Keene entra)


NED

¿Sabéis que el acantilado se derrumbado
a la altura de la cabaña de Grimes?

TÍA

¿Y dónde está él?

SRA. SEDLEY

¡Gracias a Dios que ha venido usted!

NED

A usted no se la llevará el viento.

SRA. SEDLEY

¡El carretero se retrasa más de una hora!

BALSTRODE

Y va a llegar aún más tarde: 
¡la carretera está inundada!

SRA. SEDLEY

Me niego a quedarme en este lugar.

NED

Si quiere sus píldoras, tendrá que quedarse.

SRA. SEDLEY

¿Con esas mujeres borrachas y estos gritos?

NED

Son las sobrinas de la Tía, eso es lo que son.
¡Y mucho mejor que usted para besarlas!
¡Cuidado con la puerta!

TODOS

¡Cuidado con la puerta!

(La puerta se abre de nuevo. Peter Grimes entra. 
A diferencia de los demás, no lleva chubasquero. 
Tiene el pelo revuelto. Avanza hacia el centro 
sacudiéndose el agua del cabello. La Sra. Sedley 
se desmaya al verle y Ned Keene la sostiene)


NED

¡Trae el brandy, tía!

TÍA


¿Y quién lo pagará?
NED

Ella. Cárgaselo a su cuenta.

(Mientras Peter avanza, los demás se retiran.)


CORO

Hablábamos del demonio y ahí está.
Es un demonio, un auténtico demonio.
Grimes está esperando a su nuevo aprendiz.

NED

Esta viuda pesa más 
Que dos pescadores juntos.
¡Estáis muy callados!

(Nadie responde. Peter rompe el silencio,
como si pensara en voz alta.)


PETER

En este momento la Osa Mayor y las Pléyades,
moviéndose al compás de la Tierra,
dibujan en las nubes con sus rayos
el dolor humano;
vertiendo su hálito solemne por la noche oscura.
¿Quién puede descifrar en medio en la tormenta,
o a la luz de las estrellas,
si esos caracteres significan
un destino amistoso
que haga cambiar nuestras vidas?
Pero si las constelaciones zodiacales 
centellean como un enloquecido
banco de arenques,
¿quién puede cambiar el curso de las estrellas
para volver al principio y comenzar de nuevo?

(Todos callan y luego murmuran)


CORO

¿Está loco o borracho?
¿Qué está haciendo este hombre aquí?

SOBRINAS

Su canción va a estropear la cerveza.

CORO

Está de mal humor.
¡Echadle fuera!

SOBRINAS

¿Por qué tiene que aullar?

CORO

Parece que ha estado a punto de ahogarse.

BOLES
 
(camina con paso tambaleante hasta Grimes)

Has vendido tu alma al Diablo, Grimes.

BALSTRODE

¡No te acerques a él!

BOLES

¡No le tengo miedo a Satán!

BALSTRODE

¡Déjalo en paz, estás borracho!

(Va a sujetar a Boles.)


BOLES

La luz del evangelio sanará
las cataratas que ciegan sus ojos.

PETER 

(Viendo que el borracho se dirige hacia él)

¡Déjame en paz!

(empuja a Boles rudamente y se da la vuelta.)


BOLES

No te atreves con los hombres,
lo tuyo son los niños.

(Boles coge una botella y está a punto de 
rompérsela en la cabeza cuando Balstrode 
se la quita de la mano y la arroja al suelo.)


TÍA

¡Por amor de Dios, ayúdenme a mantener la paz! 
¿Acaso quieren verme sentada ante un tribunal?

BALSTRODE

¡Que alguien empiece una canción!

(Keene empieza un estribillo.)


TÍA

¡Eso es, Ned!

(El estribillo es el siguiente)


TODOS

El viejo Joe fue a pescar y
el joven Joe fue a pescar y
quien tú sabes fue a pescar y
encontraron un gran banco.
Los sacaban a puñados,
y a cubos,
y a cazuelas.
Los sacaban fácilmente,
los limpiaban meticulosamente,
los envasaban esmeradamente,
los vendieron discretamente,
¡Oh, pásalo!

(Peter se une al estribillo; los otros se callan)


PETER

Cuando yo fui a pescar,
cuando él fue a pescar,
cuando quien tú sabes fue a pescar,
nos topamos con Davy Jones.
¡Lo saludamos horrorizados!
¡Le hablamos aterrorizados!
¡Y lo trajimos apesadumbrados!
¡Oh, pásalo!

(Se rompe el estribillo, pero los otros lo recuperan.
En el clímax del estribillo, la puerta se abre y entran Ellen Orford, el chico y el carretero. Los tres están están empapados y manchados de barro)


HOBSON

El puente se ha hundido, 
tuvimos que pasar casi a nado.

NED

¿Y tu carro?... ¿Va camino del mar?

(Las mujeres van hacia Ellen y el chico. La Tía se 
mezcla con ellas. Boles les recrimina)


ELLEN

Estamos empapados hasta los huesos.

BOLES
 
(a Ellen)

Lo tienes bien merecido, mujer.

TÍA

Querida,
hay brandy y agua caliente para todos.

SOBRINAS

Vamos a ver al chico.

ELLEN
 
(levantándose)
¡Dejadlo en paz!

SOBRINAS
 
(observando al niño)

Qué cosa más dulce.

ELLEN
 
(protegiéndolo)

¡No es para vosotras!

PETER

¡Vámonos!... ¿Estás listo?

TÍA

Deja que se calienten.
Han estado a punto de ahogarse.

PETER

Es hora de marcharse.

TÍA

Tu cabaña se la ha llevado el agua.

PETER

No, sólo el acantilado.
¡Joven aprendiz, vamos!

(El chico duda, Ellen lo lleva con Peter.)
 

ELLEN

¡Adiós, pequeño, que Dios te bendiga!
Peter te llevará a casa.

TODOS

¿A casa?... ¿Llamas a eso casa?

(Peter se lleva al chico de la mano y salen 
hacia la ululante tormenta. Telón.)

Acto II